More thoughts on Recovery & Addiction

As people in Recovery we have faced considerable truths about ourselves and we have done something about it.

The quest for sobriety is a beautiful opportunity to make en enduring impact in our own lives and the lives of those around us.  For some, those first few weeks and months offer up a freedom and joy that was long forgotten (or maybe not known before).  For others, the struggle is real and constant and especially hard to maintain the momentum of really ‘wanting’ a sober/clean life. 

For me and for countless others I’ve met and helped, this mighty quest can create a lot of internal pressure that results in overwhelm, depression, lack of energy, struggling in relationships (because things have changed) and at times an overall feeling of being trapped.

If you’re in longer-term sobriety you may have already worked the Steps several times. You’ve workshopped your situation with your friends. You’ve thought about therapy. You’ve meditated and yoga’d your way into peace (temporarily). 

And still there’s something that’s not quite right. 

There’s still that ‘thing’ that you can’t put your finger on.

  • So what you you do about that? 
  • What do you do with the emotional hangover that comes from acting out in frustration and fear and overwhelm?
  • What do you do when you gone to all that effort of getting clean and sober and things aren’t shaping up the way you’d hoped?
  • And, what do you do when you been clean and sober a long time and your life is not panning out the way you’d hoped? Work is suffering. Home is suffering. Love is suffering.

Recovery Coaching can help with that.  

I work with people in Recovery who want to:

  • Dig deep into their awareness and consciousness one day at a time.
  • Look at their whole life in an integrated way.
  • Ensure that the foundation of their Recovery is considered in all their decisions including work.

When we have spent an extraordinary amount of time looking for ourselves in all the wrong places. Coming home to yourself has a warm and welcoming energy that feels right.

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